Erin Dorney

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Posts Tagged ‘#PaLA2009

Pala 2009 – Tuesday.

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11-12 – When Students Go Mobile: The Effects of Smartphones on Information Literacy and Academic Library (Kristen Yarmey-Tylutki, Digital Services Librarian, Weinberg Memorial Library, The University of Scranton)

Smartphone – phone with computing ability

Over 50 thousand apps for iPhone as of last year

In 2008 smartphone sales in North America grew by 63%

Lost of apps are student-designed

Mobile librarians and libraries – Joe Murphy

How do these impact the research process? Information literacy?

It’s hard for students to find big blocks of time for research – mobile helps them break it up into chunks

Looking at 2000 ACRL standards for information literacy – 5 standards

What did mobile phones look like in 2000? Cell phones called people, stored contacts, could text but many people didn’t. A lot has changed since then!

Standard One: “The information literate student defines and articulates the need for information”

  • Free apps vs. authoritative, more costly apps (in terms of reference resources)
  • Talk to vendors about providing mobile interfaces
  • Think about subsidizing cost of authoritative mobile apps
  • Devices can be used to both collect and analyze data
  • Can confuse students – new set of formats (print, electronic, mobile, website, app, device specific?), third-party developers w/ somewhat sketchy documentation.
  • Cost and benefit – students pick free over pay, website over print, w/smartphones, they will probably choose mobile over computer-based.
  • It needs to be affordable and accessible to students in order for them to use it

Standard Two: “The information  literate student accesses needed information effectively and efficiently”

  • New ways of searching – the ACRL standards assume word-based searching, but now we have different input types – pictures, barcodes, audio keywords, location
  • These options can make searching easier for students, but we need to know how to help them and incorporate this into information literacy
  • No extra typing – fewest keystrokes possible = no long search strings, Boolean, etc.
  • Mobile raises expectations – traditional services won’t be enough
  • On a smartphone, we only see the first 3/4 results in a Google search – will students scroll down or click to the next page?
  • Extracting information – lots of note taking tools out there and microphones built in (i.e. Margins, tools to convert spoken notes into written notes)
  • iPhone can’t run different applications at once – this is a problem but should be fixed (Palm Pre does it)

Standard Three: “The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.”

  • Ebook apps – more time for reading in their lives, but is it “deep reading?”
  • All in one devices are fabulous but also distracting
  • Students are going to want to use things that are designed well
  • Mobile research look at more items but spend less time on/with them
  • Discussing research with peers

Standard Four: “The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group, uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.”

  • Syncing mobile and computer applications

Standard Five: “The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally”

  • Privacy issues, personal information – outward flow of information, educate students about what they post to the web and how it can impact their future
  • “Collaboration has become a fact of life” – Kristen YT

Standards hold up well, but there are some new themes relating to smartphones

Is dividing literacy between information and technology helping or harming our students?

Continuous partial attention – we need to be informed – education, psychology, sociology

What’s next? Plans to talk with students about how smartphones are being used by students. Looking for collaborators!

Q: Tools for libraries to mobilize? SMS is first step, in terms of resources, haven’t seen it written about yet

Q: Multi-literacies? Kathleen Tyner

Q: What about faculty using smartphones? Mixed bag, some embrace, some still don’t want to talk about Google. New generation of faculty will help with this transition. We don’t have to push it, but some will be interested.

12:30-2:15 – College & Research Division Luncheon Rethinking the Copyright Wars and the Role of the Academic Library (James Neal, Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian for Columbia University)

Understand trends in context

Changing library roles: consumer, intermediaries, aggregators, publishers, educators, R&D organizations, entrepreneurs, policy advocates

Scholarly communication – why do faculty publish?

“the repository movement”

Broadcast flag – chip embedded in computers to try and catch people breaking copyright laws. ALA filed a lawsuit. The computing industry also fought this.

Copyright in the future, will there be one?

Re: 108 Study Group – “Are we ready for the “hard ball” offensive that will be required to protect and advance our interests?”

Interesting cases: Author’s Guild v. Google, Cambridge University Press v. Georgia State University, Golan v. Gonzales, J.D. Salinger v. John Doe, Warner Publishing v. Spurlock

Google Books – not about public interest, not about copyright. About economics and money. Monopoly?

FRPA – making federally funded research freely available for public access. Right now the publishers have control. Trying to send this through as an Executive Order since it’s already written into federal grant documentation.


Written by Erin Dorney

October 20, 2009 at 6:20 PM

PaLA 2009 – Monday.

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9-10:15 – Putting the Wow in to Your Library Using Nonverbal and Merchandising Principles (Larry Nesbit, Library Building Consultant, Mansfield University, retired, Joyce Seno, Architect, Larson Design Group Julie Brown, Furniture Representative, Brodart Co.)

Architectural vision vs a library vision

Did a similar presentation 6 years ago at PaLA – not much information has remained the same

A successful library needs to come from the user’s perspective – not the librarians!

A square foot costs about $200.00 when all is said and done, so you need to utilize space wisely

We need to integrate computers into virtually every space in the building

Nonverbal communication is culturally specific

70% of what we communicate is nonverbal

Example: Wegmans ceramic tile  flooring in the produce section – why do they use this particular material? (because the tiles and grouting rattles the carts, causing consumers to slow down and buy more produce)

People want a safe, comfortable environment with social opportunities

Example: Cabela’s has few retail stores, in person it is the “ultimate experience”

Think about how big store entrances are in the mall – more welcoming and inviting

Vestibule – costly from a square footage perspective – try a wall display case or bench

When you walk into a library, you usually see Circulation and that’s it. When you walk into a bookstore, you see books (check out isn’t front and center).

Companies spend lots of money on market research – we don’t have that level of funding but we can use their findings and learn from what they do.

Brodart will be introducing mobile checkout units within the next year

Displays – libraries have a tendency to put too much out which defeats the purpose. People won’t browse if it looks too crowded.

Aisle space – 5 feet – “butt brushing” If a person feels uncomfortable, they will leave the area.

Make a statement, don’t just fill the space – Joyce Seno

Think about privacy for computers, specifically in information commons. Tell your students you want them to stay, not just use the computers and move on. Territory and space. Don’t put computers in an aisle (jostling and no privacy).

Seating – “A chair says we care” quote read by Julie Brown. Put chairs next to windows.

People want to be seen but not disturbed.

Borders recently announced that they are taking shelving out of their stores in order to make room for teen spaces.

Book stacks – “the forgotten zone” – Every 3 foot section of shelving costs $3,600. Use is key. Carve out spaces in stacks for seating areas. Stagger/slant shelves, use browsing units (the more people can touch, the more likely they are to take it with them). Open it up, use shelving of different heights. It’s not just a storage area.

Administrative zone – Internal spaces are important as well. You need to be comfortable in order to do your job well.

10:30-11:45 – PALS: PaLA Academy of Leadership Studies (2009 PALS graduates: Calida Barboza, King’s College, Lisa Galico, Juniata County Library, Sharon Helfrich, Andrew Bayne Memorial Library, Mike Packard, Pottstown Public Library, Paul Proces, Delaware County Community College, Heather Simoneau, Lehigh University, Jennifer Worley, Dauphin County Library System)

Initially planned on doing this every other year, but because of overwhelmingly positive response, will be doing it each year (as long as funding allows).

This was a two way street, PaLA has learned a lot from new professionals regarding the future of the association.

Most of the 2009 PALS participants were nominated and sponsored (cost $500/$600).

Complaints about the program – too busy (nonstop events/sessions), make nomination process easier (are working on this for 2010).

Q: Doing things differently because of PALS? Paul – Before PALS I was a nominal ALA/PaLA member, now I’m involved with up to 6-ish committees. Calida – Afterwords, I felt more comfortable/empowered to bring issues up at my home institution.

2:30-3:30 – iPrimer: Using the iPod Touch and iPhone in Library Reference and Education (Corrine Syster, Instructional & Information Technology Librarian, Central Pennsylvania College, Misti Smith, MLS Technology Literacy Specialist, Mount Aloysius College)

Ages 13 through 24 = half of iphone users

Cost of an 8-gb iPhone w/data plan and fees for the first two years is about $2,000.00 (this is why I don’t have one yet… damn student loans…)

iTouch is more affordable ($199.00 one-time fee for 8-gb)

Academic applications:

* Clicker/student-response systems (i.e. Turning Point ResponseWare)

* Course management systems (i.e. Blackboard Learn, Mobile Moodle)

* E-texts (i.e. Kindle App, CourseSmart)

Abilene Christian University – research showed clear impact on student engagement (w/ iPod Touch or iPhone)

University of Missouri School of Journalism – requires incoming students to have an iPhone

Standford’s free iPhone programming class has been accessed over 1 million times

iTunes U – Libraries can put tutorials here even if they don’t have iPhone/iPods

Apps to help students – iHomework, Evernote, MiGhtyDocs (helps teach time management & organizational skills)

Q: Copyright issues? Most applications handle their own copyright.

Q: App fees – are they one time or subscription? Typically one time fee. If you delete it, you can put it back on for free as long as you have synced it on your computer.

Q: How do I get Camtasia tutorials from the library website to a platform like this? You can just upload it (may have to reformat into Quicktime) to iTunes.

Written by Erin Dorney

October 19, 2009 at 6:41 PM

PaLA 2009 Schedule (draft).

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Here is a draft of my schedule for PaLA in Harrisburg next week. Hope to see some Pennsylvania colleagues there, let me know if you want to meet up for anything!

Sunday

5:15-6 – New Members Reception (I’ll be staffing the CRD table, so come check out our poster, get some candy and learn more about what you can do as a member of the College & Research Division!)

Monday

8-9 – SCC Hospitality Suite ( I’m staffing the hospitality suite as a member of the South Central Chapter)

9-10:15 – Putting the Wow in to Your Library Using Nonverbal and Merchandising Principles (Larry Nesbit, Library Building Consultant, Mansfield University, retired Joyce Seno, Architect, Larson Design Group Julie Brown, Furniture Representative, Brodart Co.)

10:30-11:45 – PALS: PaLA Academy of Leadership Studies (2009 PALS Graduates)

12-1:30 – CRD Board Meeting

1:30-2:00 – SCC Hospitality Suite

2:30-3:30 – iPrimer: Using the iPod Touch and iPhone in Library Reference and Education (Corrine Syster, Instructional & Information Technology Librarian, Central Pennsylvania College Misti Smith, MLS Technology Literacy Specialist, Mount Aloysius College)

Tuesday

9-10 – Emerging Leaders Showcase: Pennsylvania Librarians Leading the Profession (Come see me present with Jen Jarson and Rebecca Metzger about the ALA Emerging Leaders Program!)

11-12 – When Students Go Mobile: The Effects of Smartphones on Information Literacy and Academic Library (I’m moderating this session featuring Kristen Yarmey-Tylutki, Digital Services Librarian, Weinberg Memorial Library, The University of Scranton)

12:30-2:15 – College & Research Division Luncheon Rethinking the Copyright Wars and the Role of the Academic Library (James Neal, Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian for Columbia University)

4-5:30 – PaLA Annual Business Meeting

Wednesday

9-11:45 – Got Game? BRING IT! : Gaming in Libraries (My second panel, featuring co-panelists Greg Szczyrbak, Learning Technologies Librarian, Millersville University, Curtis Datko, Access Services Librarian, Alvernia University and Ryan Sittler, Assistant Professor / Instructional Technology/Information Literacy Librarian, California University of Pennsylvania. This is an interactive session where you will be able to play games!)

12-1 – Closing Luncheon The Joy of Censorship (Joe Raiola, Senior Editor, MAD Magazine)

Written by Erin Dorney

October 15, 2009 at 6:06 PM

Things you need to know about.

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Many things have been happening as of late. Some of them are culminations of projects I’ve been working on for a long time, some of them are new discoveries, and the worst of them is my annual reappointment process which is a major time-suck. Here are some of the fun ones:

LACUNY InstituteOn October 23rd I’ll be part of a panel addressing “Issues in Next Generation Librarianship” along with Jason Kucsma and Emily Drabinski. If you’re in the area, please come out to support us and join the discussion regarding inter-generational workforces, among other things. Our panel is going to be moderated by Dr. Marie L. Radford from Rutgers University and the Institute will also feature keynote speaker Stanley Wilder. I feel honored to have been selected for the panel and am looking forward to my trip to NYC, which includes a weekend with the one and only Miss Ashley Rath who will be in town working on The Apprentice. Holla!


swissmiss

I don’t know how I found out about this blog, but I sure am glad it happened. Swissmiss is a design blog and studio run by Tina Roth Eisenberg out of NYC. Charming design. Fun and inspiring posts. People, this is the blog I purposely mark as unread in my Google Reader so that I have something to look forward to during those random rough spots throughout the day. You really need to check it out.


PaLA Annual Conference

During the 2009 Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA) Annual Conference I’ll be participating in two panel discussions. You can see me on Tuesday, October 20th for “Emerging Leaders Showcase: Pennsylvania Librarians Leading the Profession” with Jennifer Jarson (Muhlenberg College) and Rebecca Metzger (Lafayette College) and on Wednesday, October 21st for “Got Game? Bring it! Gaming in Libraries” with Greg Szczyrbak (Millersville University & my mentor!), Curtis Datko & Miroslaw Liwosz (Alvernia University), and in a last minute lineup change,  Ryan Sittler (California University). Let me know if you’re going to be at the conference, and we can meet up or share a meal! And as always, I appreciate your support at the sessions :) There are a lot of interesting sessions scheduled, and in particular, I’d like to point out “PALS: PaLA Academy of Leadership Studies” on Monday (The exceptional inaugural class of PALS talking about their experiences and projects), and “When Students Go Mobile: The Effects of Smartphones on Information Literacy and Academic Library Service” on Tuesday (which I’m moderating and sounds awesome).

So what have you all been up to lately? Anything fun and exciting?

Written by Erin Dorney

October 5, 2009 at 9:58 AM

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